Pittonkatonk / Record Fest – 5.7.16

pittonk_5.7.16

Saturday was good.  I got to spend time with family, drink a few (well maybe more than a few) beers, see one of my favorite bands (who happened to play a couple of songs by a favorite musician of all time), sell a few records, buy a couple of records, and bullshit with a great local MC.  Yeah, it was all happening and it was pretty great.

The third annual Pittonkatonk Fest was taking place in Schenley Park here in Pittsburgh.  I had a blast at last year’s edition and I was really looking forward to this one.  The forecast was calling for early-evening storms, so I was super glad to find out that Opek was going on fairly early at 3:30.  There’s not much more that I need to say about Ben Opie and his various projects that I haven’t said on the blog already other than that Opek doesn’t play nearly enough these days and that it was really nice to see this stripped down guitar-less version.  The jazz/funk/big band vibe was much different than most of the other bands playing that day.  But, it was refreshing and the crowd really dug it.  Of the 6 or 7 (?) songs in their set, two were Miles Davis pieces and favorites of mine, “It’s About That Time” and “Jean-Pierre”.  Here’s a short video of their funky take on “Jean-Pierre”.  I would have recorded the whole song if I didn’t get the infamous “storage full” warning on my phone. Apologies to George Jones for cutting off his conga solo!

The next stop for me was home to grab a few crates of records to sell at Spirit in Lawrenceville.  The Pittsburgh Record Fest has been happening biannually for years now, and this was probably the 6th or 7th that I’ve sold at.  As usual, the room was filled with a bunch of great records and I had to use great restraint to avoid spending most or all of the money I made.  But for the money, I did come away with two good ones that I’ve never seen before.  I also got to chat with local rapper/producer Moemaw Naedon who happened to be my neighbor for the night.  If if don’t know about him, you need to check him out ASAP.  I’m a fan of his work and it was nice talking with him about music, digging, concerts, stolen shoes, whatever.

recordfest_16

After the sale, I made my way downstairs to finally try the pizza from Slice Island and meet up with some more friends.  DJ Tom Cox, who I know from the period of time that 720 Records was located inside of Jerry’s, was in the booth rocking a 720 t-shirt printed by yours truly.  Overall, this was a really fun and diverse Saturday well spent with family and friends new and old. Now that summer is approaching, I’m looking forward to many more like it.

 

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Ben Opie – Concerto For Orkestra – 4.12.16 – Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, Pittsburgh, PA

David Cutler: piano
Roger Dannenberg: trumpet
Emmett Goods: trombone
Ian Gordon: trumpet
Emily Hawkins: percussion
Ron Horton: trumpet
Dan Lindley: baritone saxophone
Ben Opie: alto saxophone, clarinet, theremin
Chris Parker: guitar
John Petrucelli: tenor saxophone, flute
Lou Stellute: tenor saxophone
Paul Thompson: bass
David Throckmorton: drums
Reggie Watkins: trombone

Nizan Leibovich:  conductor

On Tuesday night, I was fortunate to be able to attend the second performance of Ben Opie‘s concert-length composition entitled Concerto For Orkestra. Like the first performance of the piece, which I also witnessed, this took place at another of Pittsburgh’s various beautiful concert venues, East Liberty’s Kelly-Strayhorn Theater.

Admittingly, I do not see many composed, orchestrated performances…musical, theatrical, whatever.  So, something that was fascinating to me was the idea of going into this performance knowing the exact piece that was going to be played by the almost exact same ensemble as last time.  I loved being able to recognize some of the movements quite well but also having some seem completely new, like I had never heard them before.  Also, during the parts that I was familiar with from the debut, I was fascinated at how different some of them sounded.  I think the room may have had something to do with this.  For better or for worse, the sound in the Strayhorn seemed to me to be more muted and blended or darkened, whereas at the previous performance at the Hazlett, I remember the individual instruments sounding more shining and clear.  I’d heard that part of the reason for Ben to do this show was to get a good recording of it.  For his sake, and for the world’s, I hope that he did and that many people will be able to enjoy and appreciate this incredible work.

It truly is amazing to me that someone can not only play an instrument extremely well (see the blazing solo in the video above!) but also compose a complete piece of music like this.  My impression was that it was even more cinematic and thematic than last time.  The dark and abstract sections were even more mysterious and suspenseful than I remembered and the upbeat movements were more swinging. Definitely worth the second listening/viewing.

Ben wrote a really nice message on his blog that summed up his post-show reflections.  Read the whole post HERE.  Here’s an excerpt from that as well as a few photos from the night.  Enjoy!

“…the work is a pretty intense experience. Probably from a listening standpoint, definitely from the player’s view. But even now I catch myself…any more intense the Rite of Spring? Turangalîla-Symphonie? No, of course not. (Although, Turangalîla was a model for a ten-movement work. My piece is not nearly as dense.) You’ll drive yourself crazy making such comparisons. But, it is a 75-minute extended aural experience. Hills and valleys, ups and downs, boredom and excitement, laughs and….not-laughs. An overarching experience for over an hour.”

Matt Booth’s Palindromes – 1.13.15 – Thunderbird Cafe, Pittsburgh, PA

Ben Opie – alto sax
John Petrucelli – tenor sax
Matt Booth – bass
Jeff Grubbs – bass
Dave Throckmorton – drums


Matt Booth
brought another incredible version of his jazz project Palindromes to the Thunderbird last night as part of the weekly Space Exchange series. Some of the more intriguing Space Exchange nights in recent memory have been Booth’s due largely to the revolving cast of Pittsburgh’s finest jazz musicians that he invites to be part of his group. Last night’s lineup consisted of two saxes, two basses, and a drummer.

There have been very few occasions when I’ve seen two bass players in a band, so I made sure to clear my schedule for this one. I sort of assumed that one of the basses would have been an electric and the other an acoustic upright. Booth and Jeff Grubbs, however, both played upright acoustic basses with each player utilizing a bow at various points in the set. There is something about a group of people making music with basically just wood and metal that is just so human and raw and awesome.

palindromes_1.13Booth’s quintet delivered two sets that included compositions by Ornette Coleman, Paul Motian, Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane among others. The music was exploratory and captivating. The first set seemed slightly more composed overall whereas the second seemed slightly more free and adventurous. I’m not a huge fan of the more extreme and chaotic side of the free/avant jazz world. But I really enjoyed the place where these guys took the music last night. It was easy to get lost in sound which to me is a wonderful thing on a cold Tuesday night in Pittsburgh. I’d love to see this group play again and I know I’m not alone.